Osmunda regalis

Osmunda regalis

Osmunda regalis or Royal Fern is one of the largest ferns.

The fronds are a beautiful light green and it takes splendid colors in the fall.

Widespread geographically (America, Europe, Africa and Asia) but suffers from soil dried by agriculture and its habitat is threatened. It is therefore protected in many areas.

Prefers temperate zones but is found in the tropics as well.

Description:

Osmunda regalis is a fern of 1-1.7 m high, sometimes up to 2 m high.

It produces separate fertile and sterile fronds. The fertile fronds are arranged on the inside, the sterile fronds on the outside.

Sterile fronds are spreading, 60-160 cm long and 30-40 cm wide, bipinnate with 7-9 pairs of pinnae of 30 cm long, each pinna with 7-13 pairs of pinnules of 2.5-6.5 cm long and 1 -2 cm wide.

Fertile fronds stand upright and are shorter, 20-50 cm, usually with 2-3 pairs of sterile pinnae at the base and 7-14 pairs of fertile pinnae above with densely clustered sporangia.

Usage:

Ornamental.

Young shoots can be eaten raw or cooked and are used in the Korean royal cuisine.

The roots are used as a medium for growing orchids and other epiphytes.

In Slavic mythology, the sporangia of flowers named Perun (god of gravity, thunder and light) are known to be used to fight the demons.

Nomenclature:

Common names:

Flowering fern, royal fern

Synonyms:

Aphyllocalpa regalis, Osmunda longifolia, Osmunda mexicana, Osmunda obtusifolia, Osmunda palmeri, Osmunda palustris, Osmunda regalis f. abyssinica, Osmunda regalis var. brevifolia, Osmunda regalis var. capensis, Osmunda regalis var. longifolia, Osmunda regalis var. obtusifolia, Osmunda regalis subsp. palustris, Osmunda schelpei, Osmunda spectabilis, Osmunda spectabilis var. brasiliensis, Osmunda spectabilis var. palustris, Osmunda transvaalensis, Struthiopteris regalis

Etymology:

Osmunda: unknown
Regalis: from the Latin rēgālis (royal)

Origin:

Europe, Africa, America, Asia

Habitat:

Marshy areas, swamps and damp forests



Usage:

Ornamental.
Young shoots can be eaten raw or cooked and are used in the Korean royal cuisine.
The roots are used as a medium for growing orchids and other epiphytes.
In Slavic mythology, the sporangia of flowers named Perun (god of gravity, thunder and light) are known to be used to fight the demons.

Hardiness:

USDA zone 3-10, -40 °C

Care:

Soil:

Prefers poor soil and very acidic, very wet.

Exposure:

Partial shade, withstands shade and full sun (provided it stands very wet)

Water:

Keep substrate moist, does not resist drought

Feed:

Regular universal fertilizer during growth period

Pruning:

Remove old, dead fronds in spring, when new fronds appear

Propagation:

Spores, rhizome

Sowing instructions:

  • fill a pot with compost and sterilize it in the microwave
  • sow spores widely spaced so they do not choke each other when germinating
  • moisten and place the pot in a sealed plastic bag, leave on the window sill
  • will form a prothallus, it will look like a little rumpled sheet. It is from this that a few months later the first fronds will sprout
  • germination time: a few weeks

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