Passiflora colinvauxii

Source: C T Johansson

Passiflora colinvauxii

Passiflora colinvauxii or Passionflower is originally from the Galapagos Islands where it is threatened with extinction.

It flowers profusely in summer to autumn and smells of honeysuckle, which attracts bees.

In its habitat, it is pollinated by Xylocopa darwinii, a black bee.

Description:

Passiflora colinvauxii is a fast growing climber with bi-lobed leaves 7-16 cm.

The flowers are medium size. The sepals and petals are white. The corona consists of a series of filaments, purple with white ends.

The fruits are oval, 2-4 cm long and 1-1.5 cm wide.

Usage:

Ornamental

Nomenclature:

Common names:

Passionflower, Passion fruit

Etymology:

Passiflora: from the Latin passio (Passion) and flos (flower)
Colinvauxii: in honor of Dr. Paul Colinvaux who discovered the species in 1966 on the Galapagos Islands.

Origin:

Santa Cruz (Galapagos Islands, Ecuador), between 200 and 400 m altitude

Flowering:

June to November

Hardiness:

USDA zones 10-11

Care:

Soil:

Nutritious and well drained

Light:

Sun, partial shade

Water:

Water daily during growing period

Feed:

Fertilize every 1 or 2 weeks

Temperature:

Suitable for a South facing windowsill or a heated greenhouse

Propagation:

Seed, cutting

Sowing instructions:

  • soak the seeds 24h in lukewarm water
  • sow in a light sowing substrate
  • moisten
  • 20-30 °C
  • germination: 1 month to 1 year

Cutting instructions:

  • take cuttings in Spring or Summer
  • take cuttings at the top of the stems and make sure there is a node or a heel of older wood
  • dip the cutting in a hormone for cuttings (optional)
  • plant in a light potting soil and moisten
  • wrap everything in a plastic bag to retain moisture until the cutting is rooted

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