Aloe vera leaf

Source: Tess Watson

Aloe vera leaf

Aloe vera or True Aloe is an easy to grow succulent.

Known since ancient times for its medicinal properties, it is also a decorative and undemanding houseplant.

Description:

Aloe vera is short-stemmed shrubby aloe that produces suckers and grows in clumps.

The leaves are grayish green, sometimes with white spots. They grow in a rosette and are about 50 cm long. Margins are pinkish with many small spines.

The inflorescence is erect, up to 90 cm high and with yellow, drooping flowers of 2-3 cm long. Flowering occurs from March.

Uses:

Aloe gel is the colorless jelly-like leaf parenchyma. It is used for food, food supplements, herbal remedies, cosmetics, skin conditions, lowering cholesterol, lowering blood sugar levels.

The leaf exudate is bitter and has very different properties from the parenchyma. It has been used as a laxative but there may be harmful side effects.

Nomenclature:

Common names:

Aloe Vera, Barbados Aloe, Burn Plant, Curaçao Aloe, Medicinal Aloe, Savila, True Aloe, Unguentine Cactus, West Indian Aloe

Synonyms:

Aloe barbadensis,  Aloe barbadensis var. chinensis,  Aloe chinensis,  Aloe perfoliata var. vera,  Aloe vera var. chinensis,  Aloe vulgaris

Etymology:

Aloe: van het Grieks alóē (aloe)
Vera: van het Latijns vērus (echt)

Aloe vera clump

Source: Amy Truter

Origin:

Arabian Peninsula and East Africa

Habitat:

Grown all over the world, escaped from cultivation

Hardiness:

USDA zone 9-11

Care:

Substrate:

Potting soil mixed with sand

Light:

Sun, light

Water:

Water moderately, about once a week during the growing season, less in winter.

Fertilizer:

3-4 times a year, 10-40-10

Aloe vera inflorescence

Source: someone10x

Aloe vera inflorescence

Temperature:

Room temperature, minimum 0 °C

Propagation:

By division: take off the suckers that form around the mother plant

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