Salacca zalacca – The Palmpedia Palm Grower’s Guide

  • By: Mercedes
  • Date: June 28, 2022
  • Time to read: 5 min.

Looking to add a little excitement to your garden? Why not try growing Salacca zalacca, the Palmpedia palm! This unique plant is sure to turn heads with its dramatic foliage and fruit.

In this article, we will provide you with all the information you need to grow your own Salacca zalacca palm. We’ll discuss climate requirements, soil preferences, and propagation methods. So if you’re ready to add a little tropical flair to your garden, keep reading!

Salacca zalacca - The Palmpedia Palm Grower's Guide
Salacca zalacca – The Palmpedia Palm Grower’s Guide

Salacca zalacca

Salacca zalacca, otherwise known as the snake fruit, is a type of tropical fruit that is native to Southeast Asia. The fruit is roughly the same size and shape as a small apple, and it has a scaly, brownish-red skin. Inside the fruit is a sweet, white flesh that surrounds a large seed.

Snake fruits are often used in Southeast Asian cuisine, either as a fresh ingredient or as a dried spice. When eaten fresh, the fruit can have a slightly acidic taste. It is also used in traditional medicine, and some believe that it has numerous health benefits. The snake fruit is an exotic and unique ingredient that is sure to liven up any dish.

Salacca zalacca - The Palmpedia Palm Grower's Guide
Salacca zalacca – The Palmpedia Palm Grower’s Guide

Salak Fruit

Salak fruit, also known as snake fruit, is a type of palm tree that produces an edible fruit by the same name. The brown, scaly skin of the fruit is what gives it its nickname. Salak fruits are most commonly found in Southeast Asia, where they are often used in culinary dishes. In addition to being eaten fresh, salak fruit can also be candied or made into jams and jellies. While the fruit itself is not particularly attractive, the tree it grows on is fast-growing and relatively easy to care for. For those looking to add a unique touch to their landscape, salak trees may be worth considering.

The salak fruit is a type of palm that is native to Southeast Asia. The fruit is similar in appearance to a coconut, but it has a brown, scaly exterior. The flesh of the fruit is white and juicy, with a sweet taste. Salak fruits are typically eaten fresh, but they can also be used in jams and desserts. In addition to being delicious, the salak fruit is also rich in vitamins and minerals.

It is an excellent source of vitamin C, as well as several other vitamins and minerals. The salak fruit also contains a substance known as saponin, which has been shown to have antioxidant and anticancer properties. As a result, the consumption of salak fruits may offer some health benefits.

Salak fruit, also known as snake fruit, is a type of palm tree that produces edible fruit. The fruit is typically brown and covered with scales, which gives it its nickname. Salak fruit is most commonly found in Southeast Asia, and it is often used in traditional dishes.

The tree itself is not very decorative, but it is a fast grower. If you find salak fruit at a local market, you can have fun by sowing the seeds. The resulting tree will provide you with fresh, delicious fruit for years to come.

Salak Fruit Description

The trunk is usually crawling just below the surface, leaving only the terminal part bearing leaves above ground. It produces many suckers and grows in very dense groups.

The pinnate leaves can reach 3-7 m long. The leaf sheaths, petioles and leaflets are covered with numerous long spines.

The leaves can reach 3-7 m long, the leaflets 20-70 cm long and 2-7.5 cm wide.

The plant is dioecious. The inflorescence is composed of several axillary spadices, surrounded by a spathe. The male inflorescence is 50-100 cm long and consists of 4-12 spadices each measuring 7-15 cm long. The female inflorescence is 20-30 cm long and composed of 1-3 spadices of 7-10 cm long.

The fruit is a globose to ellipsoid drupe, formed in clusters of 15-40 per spadix, 5-7 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, tapering towards the base and rounded at the top. The skin is composed of many overlapping scales, yellow to brown, each with a small fragile spine. The flesh is composed of 3 lobes of white pulp and contains 2-3 seeds. The flesh tastes like pineapple.

Salak Fruit Usage

This palm is grown primarily for its edible fruit. It is also used as a barrier: densely growing trunks carrying strong spines form an almost impenetrable barrier.

The Salak palm is a species of palm that is native to Indonesia. The palm is grown primarily for its edible fruit, which has a distinctive, snake-like shape. The fruit is usually eaten fresh, but it can also be made into juices or jams. The Salak palm is also used as a barrier: densely growing trunks carrying strong spines form an almost impenetrable barrier. This makes the palm ideal for use in security fencing or as a hedging plant. In addition to its practical uses, the Salak palm is also popular as an ornamental plant. It can be found in many public parks and gardens across Indonesia.

Salak Fruit Nomenclature

Salak Fruit Common Names

Salak, snake fruit, snake-skinned fruit

Synonyms

Calamus zalaccan Salacca edulis, Salakka edulis

Etymology

Salacca, zalacca: common name derived from Javanese salak (snake)

Origin

The exact origin is unknown but grows wild in Java and Sumatra

Habitat

Plains, swampy rainforest between 0-500 m

Hardiness

USDA zone 10-11

Salak Fruit Care

Soil

Permanently moist soil, slightly acidic

Exposure

Sun, partial shade

Keep plantules in partial shade, older plants tolerate direct sunlight

Water

Keep the soil moist at all times

Feed

Fertilizer for palm trees, twice a month, nothing in the winter

Handling

Use gloves when handling because of the many thorns

Propagation

Seed, division, layering

Sowing instructions

  • Seeds must be very fresh as they lose viability very quickly
  • Sow in moist sphagnum or potting soil mixed with sand, cover in plastic bag
  • 30 °C
  • Germination time: 4-5 days

Division

Separate suckers from the parent plant by cutting the underground rooted trunk

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